Looking out for Generation Z

Posted by at 11:51 am

It seems that almost every segment of the real estate profession today is aimed at the Millennial Generation. Makes sense. At 80 million strong, Millennials, born between 1981 and 1996, are the largest demographic in history. And now, most have graduated college, begun careers and families, and are settling nicely into the prime spending years. But time moves inexorably forward, and it’s not too early to be talking about the next wave of potential homeowners – Generation Z. Made up of the 75 million Americans born since 1996, Generation Z is expected to start buying homes in earnest within five to 10 years. Analysts say they’re going to be a bargain-hunting, tech-loving, real estate–savvy force to be reckoned with. Watching the Great Recession unfold, most are financially conservative. They know the value of a dollar and the mathematics behind long-term...
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March 26th, 2018

Infrastructure builds the future of real estate

Posted by at 11:58 am

As the population grows, so too does the need for infrastructure improvements – more roads, more pipelines, more electricity and more water distribution channels – but who pays the price? Look at the Monopoly board. Players buy up properties, then add houses and hotels. In the game, the two utilities, Water Works and the Electric Company, do not  increase in value, no matter what happens on the rest of the board. That’s not a realistic representation – no increase in size or value of infrastructure would likely cause chaos. But beyond serving homes, infrastructure also pumps the lifeblood of America, the movement of goods along roads, highways, railroads and runways. The nation’s framework is extensive, but is aging. Existing infrastructure was built using engineering safety standards based on extreme loads seen in the past centuries. Historic flooding, hurricanes, and wildfires of 2017 showed...
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January 23rd, 2018

Autonomous cars driving housing’s future?

Posted by at 11:29 am

The idea of self-driven cars may evoke diabolical visions of the “rise of machines,” – the first step to robots becoming humanity’s overlords. Try to look deeper. Imagine a morning commute where there’s no one on cellphones, or applying makeup, or otherwise swerving wildly while they operate deadly machinery. The human element is confined – stress free – to passenger status, free to prep for meetings, nap, watch TV, or do whatever, without lousing up traffic with imperfect decision making. Free from reactive thinking, studies show just a few robotic cars help improve traffic flow. While it’s difficult to quantify the overall impact before automated cars actually arrive, there’s little doubt that these computerized rides – capable of billions of calculations a second – will be superior drivers to their all-too-human counterparts. Besides the obvious effects on traffic, there is...
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